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Thursday, October 17, 2013

Nearly 80 percent of Old Columbia Pike residents approve speed humps



Old Columbia Pike is hilly, narrow, and lacks sidewalks.

Enough residents of Old Columbia Pike in Annandale voted for speed humps, so the measure is going forward. The traffic calming plan calls for seven speed humps along Old Columbia Pike between Little River Turnpike and Lincolnia Road. 

The matter was debated at a contentious community meeting in August, with proponents arguing that speeders are creating a safety hazard, while opponents charged speed humps arent effective and slow down emergency vehicles.


An Oct. 15 letter from Mason Supervisor Penny Gross to residents in the voting area says her office received 94 ballots from the 140 households in the ballot area. Ninety-four households voted “yes,” 19 voted “no,” and one was incomplete and could not be counted.

Proponents of speed humps needed at least 70 completed ballots (50 percent), and at least 60 percent of the ballots had to be in favor of the plan. The ballots indicated a 79 percent approval rating.

“Barring any unforeseen delays, I anticipate the traffic-calming plan for Old Columbia Pike will come before the Board [of Supervisors] on Nov. 19,” Gross says. Once the BoS gives the go-ahead, the Fairfax County Department of Transportation will schedule installation of the speed humps.

6 comments:

  1. They needed sidewalks not speedhumps. How about doing it right the first time around.

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  2. They are spending $49K ($7K per hump) on these speed humps and it does nothing for the safety of the pedestrians. What a waste!

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  3. Sidewalks are much more expensive (and involve land issues) and while they are certainly desirable, Old CP would be in line behind a lot of other places. That was discussed at the community meeting.

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    1. I understand what you are saying but sometimes waiting for the right solution is better than taking the first offer. Speedhumps really are not the answer. When I drive down Old CP I see pedistrians walking in the streets because there is no sidewalk. That is where the real danger is.

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  4. This is outrageous. After an unannounced reduction in the speed limit to 25 last year to magically become eligible as a residential street (which OCP is not), we now have 75 homeowners deciding that thousands of nearby taxpayers should be compelled to drive elsewhere. This process was rigged so that a handful of self-righteous NIMBYs could quietly convert an important public thoroughfare into their own private driveway. My guess is that >95% of the citizens most affected by this will be completely unaware until they hit one of the new speed humps...

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    1. You absolutely right. 3 years ago I was interested in one of the new lux home sites on OCP but I finally backed out because the traffic was too fast. The builder told me that I was not the first customer having that issue. He quickly mentioned he'd work on a deal with Fairfax County to resolve it. He also mentioned about 500K to the county coffin if the county could move the deal quickly. So if you don't have that $$$, you won't get Fairfax county's attention. Money talks. I will come back after traffic betters. I see new sites languishing for years already...Good deal in the making now.

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