main banner

Monday, April 20, 2015

New group will represent Korean businesses in Annandale



Lunch at the Honey Pig. The Korean BBQ restaurant is a member of the Korean-American Chamber of Commerce of Virginia and will also participate in the Taste of Annandale.

A newly formed chamber of commerce is representing Korean businesses in Annandale. The group’s first major activity is co-hosting the Taste of Annandale, a community celebration on June 13 along Tom Davis Drive.

The Korean-American Chamber of Commerce of Virginia has 12 members so far, most of them based in Annandale, although businesses based elsewhere can also join, says Steve Lee, the group’s president. He hopes the new organization will help Korean merchants become more engaged in the community.



The chamber plans to help its member businesses by providing consumer rating services, mediating complaints from customers, and, after it launches a website, publishing an online guide on food served in Korean restaurants. “The most successful Korean restaurants do a better job of welcoming non-Koreans,” Lee says. He also hopes the group will convince Korean businesses to install signs in English.

15 comments:

  1. Mason District Resident4/20/15, 11:17 AM

    I love all of the Korean restaurants in Annandale!

    I see plenty of Korean signs that include English or English transliterations. Don't listen to all of the clueless haters!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, I don't know everyone gets so freaking crazy about signs that are not in English.

      Delete
    2. I think it is a sad world when you want a sign in your own country to be in English and you want to feel welcomed in the restaurant and you are the hater. There are several friendly Korean restaurants I enjoy and they are involved in the community. Honey Pig has always been a wonderful community restaurant and is welcoming to all. They are all not like that but many are and those are the ones that need rules or need to close. If I went to Korean I can not imagine that I would be able to put signs up only in English and if a Korean walked in to be rude to them.

      Delete
  2. No one mentioned the word hate.That's for you ranters.

    I believe that the point of the comment was the possibility of getting even more customers to enjoy the food and frequent the restaurants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been to enough community meetings to have seen time and time again ire-fueled people whining about Korean businesses, as if they are something WRONG with our community!

      Delete
    2. Except none of that was here...you all brought it. This article made no mention of any hate, or anyone who disliked Korean establishments or their signs. First four comments are nothing but trying to look for a fight. Chill out already.

      Delete
    3. Did you not read the article, Adam?

      The chamber plans to help its member businesses by providing consumer rating services, mediating complaints from customers, and, after it launches a website, publishing an online guide on food served in Korean restaurants. “The most successful Korean restaurants do a better job of welcoming non-Koreans,” Lee says. He also hopes the group will convince Korean businesses to install signs in English.

      The Korean-American Chamber of Commerce is a good thing, and if adding English to their signs helps them as a whole, then by gosh, do it, but I've seen and heard from the blowhards who decry the Korean signs (hint - they wouldn't frequent any Korean establishment even if they did have English on their signs. They are, to put it VERY nicely, close-minded)

      Delete
    4. The comment above is hardly a "rant." It's an honest, straightforward expression that has not one ounce of "hater" in it. The blind rhetoric that is so often spewed here is far more hatefilled than honest opinion..

      Delete
  3. Adam,

    You obviously didn't understand the third posting.

    I don't believe that the first 2 comments or the 4th
    are relevant to the article or the festival.

    Time to put that rhetoric to rest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. None of them are relevant, that was the point I was trying to make. I dont care if you want the signs in English or if you think that people who want them in English are hate-filled, I just think it's dumb to bring that conversation here when it had nothing to do with the article. Thanks for making my point.

      Delete
  4. They can keep the signs in Korean or English it does not matter. I am not supporting them, has everyone forgotten the Korean extortion ring, sweatshop, brothel, and credit card fraud ring.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-state-of-nova/post/annandale-gangster-sentenced-to-17-years-for-extortion-ring-that-terrorized-korean-merchants/2013/02/03/e6fd18c0-6cb5-11e2-8740-9b58f43c191a_blog.html

    Oh can someone tell me the name of the Korean business that was in the Annandale Fall Festival. Not a hater but just not a supporter. Peace out.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm hoping this new group will be able to engage more Koreans in our multicultural community, bridge gaps in understanding and share best business practices (including explaining how regulations and taxes work) for a win-win. Participating in the Taste of Annandale is a great start.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I am NOT anti-Korean owned business, but I do feel the community is so saturated with Asian (the continent - so Korean, Indian, Thai food etc) that I often feel disappointed with the local food offerings. I just wish there was a little more variety since I'm not a huge fan of that type of food.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A Korean-American Chamber of Commerce sounds like a great idea. They will not only support one another, but support the community of Annandale. Congratulations to whoever got this going!.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Catalina Garcia,
    Let me recommend Burger King. you can have it your way.

    ReplyDelete