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Friday, December 11, 2015

Infill development opposed by neighbors under way at Seven Corners


The home sites are labeled and ready to build on.

Construction is expected to start soon on seven single-family houses at the end of Peace Valley Lane in Seven Corners.

The new houses, known as the Reserve at Oakview, will be built after they are sold. Construction of a spec house will start the first week of January and should be completed in May, says Rich Rudnicki, regional sales manager at Evergreene Homes. The company has just started marketing the homes; none of them have been sold yet. 


Seven houses, arranged around a cul de sac, will be squeezed into a site less than two acres. [Evergreene Homes]
The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors approved anamendment to the Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan in May 2012 allowing the infill housing development to go forward.

Residents of Ravenwood Park and the Vinewood townhouse community had bitterly fought the project, arguing that too many houses were proposed for a 1.89-acre site. The number of houses was subsequently reduced from eight to seven. 


The road and curbs inside the property have been completed.
Residents had also raised concerns with stormwater, an insufficient buffer zone, and the possibility of connecting the two separate sections of Peace Valley Lane. The BoS assured them that the road would remain a dead end. The only way to access Oakview is from Leesburg Pike.

The Paxton
There are two home styles at Oakview. The Paxton is 2,896 square feet and has four bedrooms, two and a-half bathrooms (with an option for two more), a full basement, two-car garage, porch, and high-end finishes. It’s priced at $879,990. The Taylor, priced at $894,990, has the same features but is larger, at 2,961 square feet.

Evergreene has established a homeowners association that will be in charge of the common area on the property, Rudnicki says. The stormwater facility on the site is a rain garden that will blend in with the landscaping.
The Taylor
Evergreene acquired the property in April 2014 from Will Collins, who had submitted the applications for a Comprehensive Plan amendment and rezoning. Evergreene is the same company that is seeking to build an infill development, known as Brooks Place, that is being fought in the courts by the Malbrook subdivision.

10 comments:

  1. Thanks, Penny Gross!

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  2. I thought the building of "cul de sacs" was no longer permitted in Fairfax County by orders from the Fire Marshall.

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    1. That was a state law, and was repealed (and note it still allowed large developments to have cul de sacs, as long as there multiple entries to the development)

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  3. Expensive trash houses for expensive trash people.

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    1. Show me the non-expensive houses for the non-expensive trash people in Seven Corners and I will buy.

      Unlike the development at Malbrook I support this one.

      These should be a better alternative than the Town Homes they are building on Columbia Pike.

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  4. this is what happens when you re elected Gross. She is in the pocket of developers.

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  5. The Stuart HS district needs more single-family homes like this and fewer overcrowded apartments in Culmore. Glad the developer was able to work it out and move forward.

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    Replies
    1. I agree.

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    2. can we do a kickstarter to level Culmore?

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    3. Try a gofundme project to raise enough cash to buy a place in a respectable Arlington neighborhood.

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