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Saturday, February 25, 2017

Shear Shack is latest tenant to vacate Pinecrest Plaza


Pinecrest Plaza on Route 236 and Braddock Road now has seven vacancies, since Shear Shack moved out Feb. 24. With space for 32 tenants, nearly a third of the shopping center is empty.

Shear Shack relocated to 205 S. Whiting St., #306, in Alexandria, in the Landmark area.

The salon and day spa has been in Pinecrest Plaza for 27 years but left because it was no longer financially feasible to stay. “Every year the rent has gone up. The new lease was way up,” says Shear Shack owner Harjeet Jolly.  

Pinecrest Plaza lost its anchor when Staples closed in October. Representatives of Edens have failed to return repeated phone calls about what might happen to that space or whether there are plans to redevelop the property.

“I don’t know what’s going on. They don’t tell us anything. No one returns our calls,” says Jolly.

Storefronts have stayed vacant long after other tenants left, Jolly says. Among the businesses that have vacated Pinecrest Plaza: a drycleaners, chiropractor, tennis store, tutoring center, Let’s Dish, Menchie’s frozen yogurt, and Flippin Pizza.


“Every year more businesses are going. Last year was the worst,” Jolly says. Shear Shack wasn’t hurt when Supercuts opened, but says it’s “not good work ethics” to have two hair salons in the same center. 

15 comments:

  1. Tear it down and put in a Wegmans!

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  2. Who needs another over priced grocery store? We want a walMart

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    1. Gross! Anything but Walmart.

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  3. Walmart? Gross. No thanks. Wegman's is not overpriced on staples. Their cookies, yes, way pricey.

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    1. I'd like to see a Wegman's around here, especially if the Aldi at Gallows and Columbia Pike doesn't stick.

      Walmart? No. No. No.

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  4. I moved here in the 90s and it was FRESH FIELDS before Whole Foods came around. I think a WF or TRADER JOE'S would be the right-size for that location. IMHO

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    1. I remember the day that I walked up to the Fresh Fields store to read the note on the door, saying that they had moved "just down the street." NO! They were WAAAAY down the street. What a slap in the face.

      I really miss them, especially since Healthway was priced out of their spot near the Jukebox Diner. Every time I drive past their old store, I take a peek to see who's taken their place. Guess what--NO ONE. I hope the landlord feels the hole in his nasty, greedy pocket! The words I'd use to describe him wouldn't be appropriate on this site.

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  5. Gross needs to ungross this area and get some good retailers in here. That shopping center has been in a decline ever since Whole Foods departed. The big problem is that the socio economics continues of Mason continues to spiral downward. The County just stands by and asks for more taxes to compensate for the lack of attracting revenue earning demographics and businesses to prop up the tax base. This is economics 101. We can no longer be the bread basket if there is no wheat and flower to put in the County's broken ovens.

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  6. Replies
    1. ok, got me flour, but all we have in Mason is weed flowers and vacant storefronts!

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  7. This is when as the Mason District Supervisor, Gross should be calling the shopping center to see how her office can help our community by not leaving a nearly empty shopping center. Gross once again does not care unless it is going to help fill her coffers.

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  8. The issue has little if anything to do with local politics and everything to do with the financial interests of the landlords. In this case it's an out-of-state realty corporation that jacks up rents for stores that want to stay in business and is happy to take a "tax loss" from empty storefronts to offset profits from other real-estate holdings. When the corporation's interests change, rents will again become reasonable and new businesses will return -- as long as their market research ensures them that there's a viable customer base. It's simple Econ 101 supply-and-demand in action.

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    1. No, it has much to do with local politics and little to do with "classic supply and demand". It is called rent-seeking. You should take a remedial course in Econ 101 immediately.

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